November 1 – All Saints – Originating in the 4th c. Eastern Feast of All Martyrs, and attested to by St. Efrem (+373), Pope Gregory IV established this commemoration for all the Roman Church in 835. Originally celebrated on Easter Friday, it came to be held in Rome on May 13th; later, in the 9th century, it was transferred to November 1st, the date of its celebration in Ireland where it countered the Celtic pagan feast of the Druids.

 

November 2 – All Souls – Rooted in ancient Christian tradition (2nd century & Tertulian), St. Odilo of Cluny established a memorial of all the faithful departed in 988. It was accepted in Rome in the 13th century. An Apostolic Constitution of Pope Benedict XV in 1915 granted all priests the privilege of celebrating three Masses on that day for the following intentions: one Holy Mass for particular intention, another Holy Mass for all the faithful departed and a third Holy Mass for the intention of the pope. The month of November, especially All Souls Day, is a traditional time for visiting graves of loved ones, as is the anniversary of death.

 

November 3 – St. Martin de Porres, religious – born in Lima in Peru of a Spanish father and a black slave mother; Dominican lay brother who ministered to the poor and the sick, especially black slaves; devoted to the Holy Eucharist; a close friend of St. Rose of Lima; patron of social justice and of peoples of mixed races. Died 1639

 

November 4 – Charles Borromeo, bishop – Cardinal and secretary of state at age 22 for his uncle, Pope Pius IV; implemented reforms of Trent in his diocese of Milan; founder of seminaries; considered a model pastor by many bishops, including Francis de Sales; held 5 provincial councils and 11 diocesan synods; patron of catechists and of catechumens. Died November 3, 1584 at age 46. Patron saint of late Pope  Blessed John Paul II (Charles – Karol WOJTYLA)

 

November 9 – The Dedication of the Lateran Basilica – This feast marks the anniversary of the dedication of the cathedral church of Rome, on land owned by the Laterani family, by Pope St. Sylvester I, November 9, 324. Honored as the Episcopal seat of the pope as bishop of Rome, it is the “mother and head of all churches of Rome and the world”; residence of the popes from the 4th century until their moving to Avignon (1309); site of 5 ecumenical councils; dedicated to the Savior, later to St. John the Baptist.      

             

November 10 – St. Leo the Great – eminent pastor & preacher; defender of the Roman primacy; combated Pelagianism and Manichaeism; his Tome on Christ’s two natures was adopted by Council of Chalcedon (451); many of his prayers are found in the Sacramentary; saved Rome from marauding Huns and Vandals. Died 461.

 

November 11 – St. Martin of Tours, bishop -  from Pannonia (in Hungary); soldier turned Christian at 18; disciple of St. Hilary; at Liguge, founded the first monastery in the West; bishop of Tours; first non-martyr with annual feast in the  Western Church; patron of soldiers, wine producers, and of France. Died 397. Also Veterans Day.

November 12 – St. Josaphat, bishop & martyr – born in Poland, raised Ukrainian Orthodox, becoming a Basilian monk of the Ukrainian Byzantine Catholic Rite at Vilna; bishop of Polotsk; his fidelity to the Roman See and his desire for union between the Ukrainian Church and Rome led to his martyrdom at Vitebsk; Died 1623; first formally canonized saint of the Eastern Rite (1867)

November 13 – St. Francis Xavier Cabrini – from Lombardy; Italy; youngest of 13 children; founded the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart; for 28 years labored in U.S. & South Africa, establishing some 67 institutions (schools, hospitals, and orphanages). She died in Chicago, Dec. 22, 1917. First U.S. citizen canonized (1946); patroness of immigrants and migrants.

November 15 – St. Albert the Great, bishop & doctor of the Church – from Swabia; Dominican master of philosophy, theology, & the natural sciences, especially Aristotle; teacher of St. Thomas; Provincial of the German Dominicans (1254-1257), becoming bishop of Regensburg; prolific writer; wrote on the cult of the Sacred Heart; patron of scientists. Died 1280

November 16 – Sts. Margaret of Scotland & Gertrude – St. Margaret from Hungary; wife of King Malcolm III of Scotland and mother of eight; helped root out paganism; her love for the poor became legendary; patroness of Scotland. Died 1093. 

St. Gertrude – born in Thuringia; Benedictine mystic who wrote on the meaning of suffering, the Sacred Heart, the Trinity and God’s love; most important work: The Herald of Divine Love.

 

November 12 – St. Josaphat, bishop & martyr – born in Poland, raised Ukrainian Orthodox, becoming a Basilian monk of the Ukrainian Byzantine Catholic Rite at Vilna; bishop of Polotsk; his fidelity to the Roman See and his desire for union between the Ukrainian Church and Rome led to his martyrdom at Vitebsk; Died 1623; first formally canonized saint of the Eastern Rite (1867)

 

November 13 – St. Francis Xavier Cabrini – from Lombardy; Italy; youngest of 13 children; founded the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart; for 28 years labored in U.S. & South Africa, establishing some 67 institutions (schools, hospitals, and orphanages). She died in Chicago, Dec. 22, 1917. First U.S. citizen canonized (1946); patroness of immigrants and migrants.

 

November 15 – St. Albert the Great, bishop & doctor of the Church – from Swabia; Dominican master of philosophy, theology, & the natural sciences, especially Aristotle; teacher of St. Thomas; Provincial of the German Dominicans (1254-1257), becoming bishop of Regensburg; prolific writer; wrote on the cult of the Sacred Heart; patron of scientists. Died 1280

 

November 16 – Sts. Margaret of Scotland & Gertrude – St. Margaret from Hungary; wife of King Malcolm III of Scotland and mother of eight; helped root out paganism; her love for the poor became legendary; patroness of Scotland. Died 1093.

St. Gertrude – born in Thuringia; Benedictine mystic who wrote on the meaning of suffering, the Sacred Heart, the Trinity and God’s love; most important work: The Herald of Divine Love.

 

November 17 – St. Elizabeth of Hungary, religious – wife of Louis VI of Thuringia and mother of three; as widow, she became a Frnciscan tertiary, dedicated to the needs of the poor and the sick; canonized only four years after her death; patroness of the Franciscan Third Order and the Catholic Charities. Died 1231 at age 23.

 

November 18 – The Dedication of the Basilicas of Sts. Peter & Paul, apostles; Rose Philippne Duchesne, virgin – Around 330 Emperor Constantine built a basilica over the tomb of St. Peter. Reconstruction began in the 14th c. and the present basilica of St. Peter was consecrated Nov. 18, 1626 by pope Urban VIII. The construction of St. Paul’s on the Via Ostiense was begun by Valentinian II in 386, takng the place of a smaller church built by Constantine. Destroyed by fire in 1823, the new basilica was consecrated Dec. 10, 1854 by Pope Pius IX who joined in one solemn celebration the dedication of these two basilicas. Rose Philippine Duchesne – from Grenoble, France; founded the first American house of the Religious of the Sacred Heart; opened the first American free school west of the Mississippi; known for her courage and desire to serve native Americans.

 

November 21 – The Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary – This memorial finds its origins in a 2nd c. apocryphal source, the Protoevangelium Sancti Jacobi (The Gospel of St. James), and the dedication on Nov. 21, 543 of the Basilica of St. Mary the New in Jerusalem.

November 22 –  St. Cecilia, martyr – known from her Passio, a poem which exalts Christian virginity; honored in Rome since the 5th century; mentioned in the Roman Canon; patroness of sacred music. Died 3rd century. November (22nd; 4th Saturday of the month)

 

 

November 23 – Sts. Clement I, pope & Martyr; Columban, abbot & Blessed Miguel Agustin Pro, priest & martyr. – St. Clement I was a fourth bishop of Rome; wrote famous epistle to the Corinthians; mentioned in the Roman Canon. Died 100A.D. under Trajan. – St. Columban – Irish monk & missionary to France; wrote a strict monastic rule & Penitential; founded monasteries at Luxeuil, Bobbio & elsewhere; exiled to Italy for denouncing court immorality & lax bishops; died at Bobbio in 615. – Miguel Pro – from Guadalupe, Mexico; Jesuit noted for his sympathetic nature and firm piety; during Maxican religious persecution, he was accused of plotting against government and was executed while exclaiming, “ Long live Christ the King”.

 

November 24 - St. Andrew Dung-Lac – priest & martyr & his companions – martyrs. Vietnamese martyrs (17-19 c.) ; all canonized June 19, 1988. It is Thanksgiving Day in the USA.

 

November 25 - St. Catherine of Alexandria, virgin & Martyr – A learned women of the early fourth century who, following her conversion at the age of eighteen, preached the Gospel throughout Alexandria in Egypt. While imprisoned by the emperor Maximus, she converted both the empress and the leader of the armed forces, & for this she was martyred. This memorial has been newly included in the Universal Calendar.

 

November 27 - Miraculous Medal - Saint Catherine Laboure is often associated with this devotion; as she received a number of visions from Our Lady in the 1830's as regards this Medal. Saint Catherine Laboure was a "Sister of Charity".

"The Miraculous Medal is a physical manifestation of the gift of grace that perpetually exudes from Our Lady and it, too, is a Sacramental, a most miraculous one. It was originally called the Medal of the Immaculate Conception, but because so many miracles were reported by those wearing it that it became known as the Miraculous Medal. Often the Medal is presented to Catholics who are making their first holy Communion, receiving the Sacrament of Confirmation and given at Baptisms.

The Blessed Virgin Mary declared that those who wear it around their necks will be given wondrous graces, among them, not sinking into a life of iniquity or becoming more pure".

 

November 30 – St. Andrew Apostle & martyr -  Brother of Simon Peter and disciple of John the Baptist; tradition holds he preached north of the Black Sea and in Greece; died bound to an X-shaped cross at Patras, Greece; patron of Russia and Scotland; as “Protoclete”, or “First Called”, patron of the Greek Church; patron of fishing industry; mentioned in the Roman Canon. Died 1st century.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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SAINTS OF NOVEMBER